Tag Archives: Wine

Tuscan Pork Tenderloin

Since retiring, I have been indulging myself in a wide variety of projects, basically all the stuff I’ve been wanting to do since, like, forever. One that I am having some fun with is cooking. It is easy to combine with one of my other loves, wine. As my co-conspirator in life has similar tastes, this was a no-brainer to move forward on. So I have put writing a book, learning to speak Spanish and becoming a guitar hero on the back burner while I concentrate on this one. I did allude to this in a previous post, here about my latest bucket list.

Our Saturday night dinner this time was Tuscan Pork Tenderloin. A very simple recipe, quick to prepare with very little fuss or muss. Here’s the recipe. Note it is for 4 servings, but we find far too often that 4 equals 2.5.

Ingredients

Ingredient Checklist

4 servings

  • 1 ⅓ teaspoons garlic, minced
  • ⅘ teaspoon dried rosemary
  • ⅘ teaspoon dried oregano
  • ⅓ teaspoon salt
  • ⅓ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 ⅓ pounds pork tenderloin

Directions

Step 1 Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F (220 degrees C).

Step 2 Combine garlic, rosemary, oregano, salt, and pepper in a small bowl. Rub spice mixture all over the pork tenderloin. Place in a baking dish.

Step 3 Bake in the preheated oven until pork is slightly pink in the center, 20 to 25 minutes. An instant-read thermometer inserted into the center should read at least 145 degrees F (63 degrees C). Remove from oven and let stand for 5 minutes before slicing.

Like I said, very simple. We would suggest upping the time to 30 to 35 minutes. That was the only issue we had. The clean up was super easy as well. We used Jasmine rice for a base, mixed with frozen broccoli and butternut squash. The vegetables were cooked in a bit of olive oil and spiced with salt and pepper to taste.

We paired the dish with one of our go to wines, Meiomi Pinot Noir. The two went together very nicely. The wine is a typical California Pinot, although it has more of a vanilla taste than most. A popular brand, it goes in the $20.00 range.

Overall the supper was a success and one we will repeat in future. The tenderloin was excellent. The minimal spice only accented the overall taste and melded with the wine. I’d rate it a 9 of 10, very subtle, very good.

What’s Up Next – Some Notes

The Real Canadian Music Blog

Photo by Min An on Pexels.com

Hi all

We have a full schedule next week. First off, we will see the first article from our new writers, Dean Johnston and Laynni Locke. They will be contributing articles on travel on a regular basis. They have been traveling extensively for the last 15 years or so and I believe are up to 80 countries at this time. They are currently in Crete as part of a 3 month journey in Europe. Look for the first article to drop on Monday November 8, 2021. A big welcome to them.

A new series that will appear regularly is “Saturday Supper”. In this, we will take you through a dish from scratch with a recipe and hints. We will also comment on the wine we enjoyed with the meal and give you comments on the meal itself, thumbs up, or thumbs down. I f…

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Top 10 Bucket List Items – Number 9

Number 9 on my personal bucket list is becoming a better cook. In our travels, we have run into so many different cuisines that we wish we could import into our kitchen. As we get closer to our retirement, I have begun exploring various authors and recipes and have started learning the nuances to better, healthier (sometimes) food. As we both love food and wine, this endeavour is a natural for us. As we go, we will be sharing recipes that we found to be especially good, giving credit to the contributor, as well as commenting on the wine we chose to pair with the dish.

The early reviews from the household foodie have been positive and for that, I am motivated to continue.

We created the following dish and it is now noted as a favourite. We paired with a 2017 King Estate Pinot Noir, from the Williamette Valley of Oregon. It paired well with the dish, a Pinot or Chardonnay would be our recommendation for this pairing. The wine was fairly light and smooth, quite dry and a bit acidic. The main notes we tasted were cherry and red berries with some oak as well. Overall, we gave it 3.9 rating on a 5 scale. Not quite a 4, but still very good.

The dish itself is very tasty and fairly easy to prepare. As a note, cooking with chicken thighs changes everything you know about chicken. We did not add the heavy cream.

Our first experiment, as found at;

Familystyle Food Home | Familystyle Foodhttps://familystylefood.com/

We have found this website to be very helpful and stacked with multiple off the grid style recipes. We highly recommend it.

Chicken in White White Sauce (Vino Bianco)

INGREDIENTS


INSTRUCTIONS
2 1/2 pounds boneless skinless chicken thighs (or 6 bone-in)
Kosher salt
Freshly ground black peppercorns
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup finely chopped onion
2 tablespoons finely chopped or grated garlic
1 cup sun-dried tomatoes (not oil-packed) coarsely chopped
1 cup dry white wine (such as pinot grigio)
1/2 cup chicken stock or water
3 fresh thyme sprig plus 2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves for serving
1 pound dried fettuccine or tagliatelle pasta
2-3 tablespoons heavy cream optional
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese

Season the chicken on all sides with 2 teaspoons of the salt and black pepper to taste. Sprinkle the flour over the chicken and turn it to coat.

Heat the oil over medium-high heat in a 3 or 4-quart deep skillet or saute pan until it begins to shimmer. Add the chicken in 2 batches and sear until golden on both sides, about 5 minutes per side. Remove to a platter.

Add the onion and garlic to the pan and cook until softened and fragrant, about 3 minutes.
Pour in the wine and let it bubble 1 minute. Add the stock or water and 1/4 teaspoon salt.
Return the chicken to the pan and add the tomatoes. Put the herb sprigs on top of the chicken.

Cover the pan and turn the heat down to a very low simmer. Cook 30-35 minutes for boneless chicken and 60-75 minutes for bone-in pieces. The chicken meat should be tender and falling off the bone.

Cook the pasta in a large pot of salted water until al dente. Drain and transfer to a large serving bowl.

Pull the thyme sprigs out of the pan and discard. Using two forks, break the chicken in the pan into large chunks. If you cooked bone-in thighs, discard the bones and stir the meat to combine with the pan sauce. If you’re using cream, stir it in.

Pour the chicken and the pan sauce over the pasta. Sprinkle with the cheese and additional thyme leaves and toss everything together. Enjoy!

Chicken in White White Sauce (Vino Bianco)

The Wine.

2017 King Estates Pinot Noir

Wine Wednesday – 2018 J.LOHR MERLOT

We paired this with a Chicken Parmesan, heavy on the cheese and a Cesar salad. J.Lohr has always been a go to wine, both this and the Cabernet. The Chardonnay is also excellent.

The Merlot is a very smooth, dry wine and very soft on the palate. It has major oak, vanilla and chocolate notes. You can pretty much pair it with anything.

You have likely noticed that we are big on California wines, and with good reason. They are usually fairly light, yet bold with strong berry and vanilla hints prevalent. They are reasonably priced, this one in the mid 20’s. I would recommend this wine for any type of occasion, even (especially?) just having a glass. We rate it 4.1 of 5 stars.

PS: For some reason The BC price was 16 cents lower than the average on Vivino. SHHSHH, don’t let them know.

Wine Wednesday – 2019 Meiomi Pinot Noir

2019 Meiomi Pinot Noir

This wine qualifies as one of our go to varieties. We’ve been opening this one since 2010, or maybe earlier. Very consistent and bursting with more flavour that your average Pinot. Major cherry and berries in the palate, also a bit oaky. Extremely smooth and has a sweetness to it as well. Easy to drink and pairs favourably with most dishes. We recently had it with a maple chipotle pork tenderloin and it worked very well. We also enjoy it with salmon dishes. Highly recommend, a 4.3 on our 5 scale. Our tip to you is drink it from a Pinot glass, you will notice the difference immediately when compared to a regular red wine glass.

Here’s a link to guide you to some perfect glasses.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/lmowery/2019/10/16/the-best-wine-glasses-for-pinot-noir/?sh=7252db9840be

In conclusion, the price, Vivino notes as an average price 19.75. In British Columbia, 24 bucks. They sure like to gouge you here.

Speaking of Vivino, this is a great app, and available on all platforms. Take a picture of the label while in the app and voila, you have everything you wanted to know about that wine. They look at you funny in the liquor store, but, hey, why buy bad or overpriced wine.

See you next Wednesday.

Wine Review -Tom Gore 2018 Cabernet

2018 Tom Gore Cabernet Sauvignon

A workhorse Cabernet with oaky notes and definite hints of blackberry and cherry. Very typical of California Cabernet’s. Reasonably priced, usually in the $15.00 range (unless you live in British Columbia, think $18.00) and suitable for pretty much any meat dish. We enjoyed with home made pizza, lots of cheese. Recommend for the budget conscious among us, I gave it 4 stars of 5.

Chateau Ste. Michelle Merlot

Chateau St. Michelle Merlot

Chateau Ste Michelle is an American winery, situated in Washington state.  The wines from this area are becoming quite well-known and are carving out a name for themselves.  The vineyards have been in existence since the repeal of prohibition.

The wine we are reviewing is a 2011 Merlot, purchased at the Real Canadian Liquor Store here in Calgary, and is reasonably price at below $20.00.  We paired it with a Montreal spice chicken breast and sweet potato, all off the barbecue, and it was excellent.

To be truthful, I consider this purchase to be a steal and highly recommend it to our friends and readers.  Typical of Merlot, it was light and flavorful, with minimal earthiness. A very good pair to the spiced breasts.  There are hints of black cherry and some definite spiciness  There are many fruit flavors and it has a good finish.  In addition to pairing with food, it is very suitable for plain old every day sipping.

For more information on the winery, I have added a few links for you..

Home page

Twitter

Facebook

YouTube

 

Quails’ Gate Reserve Pinot Noir

 

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Quails’ Gate is a Canadian winery, located in the Okanagan Valley of British Colombia.  The wine, a reserve Pinot Noir, approximately $45 CAD.  As we usually find for wines from this region, it is very earthy, not something I find desirable in a Pinot.  We like our Pinot’s to be very fragrant to the nose and light and flavorful to the tongue. This is my common complaint for wines from BC.  Having said that, I would very much recommend this one for a variety of reasons.  First, many people prefer the earthiness exhibited by this bottle, so I must disqualify myself from being overly critical, just not my cup of tea so to speak.  Second, I have had many wines in this price range that were inferior to this one.  Finally, it is a Canadian wine and I must support it just on that alone.  You be the judge after you have tried it.  I give it a 3 out of 5 on our personal scale, and will stick to the French or California Pinot’s.

Monasterio De Las Vinas – Wine Review

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Our featured wine on this lovely Wine Wednesday is a 2006 Granacha, Tempranillo & Carinena blend created by the Spanish winery co-op, Grandes Vinos Y Vinedos, S.A in Valencia.  Monasterio is a part of this group and have created an excellent wine in this 2006 Reserva.  We enjoyed this vintage with a red pepper chicken, which complimented nicely the peppery plum bouquet and palate.  An extremely good value at 12.50 CAD.  We purchased here in Calgary at the Real Canadian Liquorstore.  If there was any downside to this wine, is that is nearing the end of its cellar life.  The vintner recommends a cellar of 6-7 years, meaning it is passing ts prime here in 2015.  Likely explains the price point.